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No Child Left Behind


Federal Barriers to Innovation - What if there were an addictive game that could efficiently teach children to read? "Think Angry Birds meets Dick and Jane," write Raegen Miller and Robin Lake, imagining the possibilities for technology to accelerate learning. In "Federal Barriers to Innovation" they laud the education department's fledgling efforts at research and development, but point out areas in Title 1 and IDEA Part B funding (which comprise 68% of all federal spending on elementary and secondary education) in which rules that come with the money could be adjusted to allow for more experimentation. (CRPE, November 2012)...

Selected States and School Districts Cited Numerous Federal Requirements As Burdensome, While Recognizing Some Benefits - The authors interviewed state and school district officials about federal requirements they found burdensome. These requirements were related to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title I, Part A; the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B; national school meals programs; or other requirements related to the receipt of federal funds. Officials described the burdens associated with these requirements as complicated, time-intensive, and duplicative, among other things, and characterized most of the requirements as being burdensome in multiple ways. The report provides recommendations to the Secretary of Education on ways to reduce the burden of unnecessary requirements. (U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), June 2012)...

U.S. Department of Education, FY 2011 Annual Performance Report - The United States Department of Educationís Annual Performance Report for fiscal year 2011 presents detailed information about progress in meeting the Departmentís strategic goals and objectives and key performance measures. The report accompanies the Administrationís budget request to Congress. (U.S. Department of Education, February 2012)...

School Improvement Grants: Early Implementation Under Way, but Reforms Affected by Short Time Frames - GAO was asked to provide information on (1) how states administered the SIG programs for grants in 2010-11;(2) what factors influenced the implementation of SIG interventions on selected schools in 2010-2011; and (3) how the U.S. Department of Education provided oversight of SIG implementation and measured performance to date. GAO recommends SIG grants be awarded to districts earlier to give more time to successfully plan and implement the SIG reforms. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, July 2011)...

Federal Compliance Works Against Education Policy Goals - Key points the authors make in this study include: (1) Federal compliance rules can stifle innovation and hinder federal programs from reaching their goal of increased student achievement; (2) States often impose more restrictive rules than the federal law requires; and (3) Congress and education policymakers should clarify and streamline these requirements so schools can focus less on compliance and more on raising student achievement. (American Enterprise Institute, July 2011)...

How Federal Education Policy Under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Can Support States in School Improvement - Researchers examined the federal and state roles in improving schools and student achievement. They found that states are still searching for the most effective ways to improve schools and that no specific strategy yet exists that will work for all states. They concluded that federal policymakers should consider the key issues of state capacity, cost, and state politics when designing policies to improve public education. (Jennifer Li, Rand Corporation, May 2011)...

Federal and State Roles and Capacity for Improving Schools - The potential reauthorization of ESEA provides an opportunity to reevaluate the roles of the federal government and the states with respect to improving schools and boosting student achievement. This report considers alternatives. (RAND Education, 2011)...

Public Schools and the Original Federal Land Grants - Background piece for Get the Federal Government Out of Education, produced by the Center on Education Policy in 2011. This piece looks at the federal land grants given to states for the support of public schools. (Center on Education Policy, April 2011)...

Get the Federal Government Out of Education? That Was't the Foundation Fathers' Vision - Paper responding to cries from congressmen to dismantle the U.S. Department of Education. (Center on Education Policy, 2011)...

Regulations.gov - Regulations.gov is your online source for U.S. government regulations from nearly 300 federal agencies. (Regulations.gov 2011)...

How Public Education Benefits From the Tax Code - This background paper is intended to serve as a companion to the CEP report, Get the Federal Government Out of Education? That Wasnít the Founding Fathersí Vision. That report discusses the historical foundations and current purposes of the federal role in education. This paper goes into more detail about an issue mentioned briefly in the other reportóthe financial benefits that education incurs from special federal tax provisions for individual taxpayers, particularly the deduction for state and local taxes. (Center on Education Policy, 2011)...

Department of Education: Improved Oversight and Controls Could Help Education Better Respond to Evolving Priorities - As a result of this review, the GAO recommends that the Department of Education take steps to better estimate workloads, strengthen safeguards over its performance management system; properly implement established contract monitoring guidelines; and improve its management controls over information technology resources. The Department of Education generally agreed with GAO recommendations. (U.S. Governor Accountability Office, February 2011)...

School Improvement Grants: Take 2--Lessons Learned from Round 1 - This publication provides local and state officials with a framework to revise the Round 2 School Improvement Grant (SIG) process. SIG, both in the level of its funding and the boldness of its requirements, is an unprecedented attempt to alter the fate of students in low-performing schools nationwide. There has never before been an opportunity to dedicate this much national energy and resources to the turnaround of failing schools. However, while SIG may be a huge opportunity for dramatic change, if mismanaged, it is also a huge opportunity to once again fail our students, families, and communities. (Mass Insight Education, December 2010)...

U.S. Department of Education FY 2010 Agency Financial Report - This is the first of three reports required under the Office of Management and Budget's Program for Alternative Approaches to Performance and Accountability Reporting. The remaining two reports, the FY 2010 Annual Performance Report and the FY 2010 Summary of Performance and Financial Information, will be released in February 2011. (U.S. Department of Education, November 2010)...

Bitter Pill, Better Formula: Toward a Single, Fair and Equitable Formula for ESEA Title I, Part A - Federal policymakers and education officials, aware of the potential ferocity of a "formula fight" tread with care when it comes to revising the way Title I, Part A of ESEA distributes funds. But the authors feel the formula driving Title I-A grants require a major overhaul because, in short, they favor wealthy states and enormous school districts. Many schools serving high concentrations of poor students are being shortchanged. (Center for American Progress, February 2010)...

A Race to the Top Scorecard - The four reform areas which states must plan for in the Race to the Top funds are standards and assessments, data systems, great teachers and leaders, and turning around low-achieving schools. The great teachers and leaders is the most important in point scoring. The National Council on Teacher Quality offers valuable advice. (National Council on Teacher Quality, December 2009)...

Rethinking the Federal Role in Elementary and Secondary Education: Summaries of Commissioned Papers - The Center on Education Policy has undertaken a project to rethink the federal role in elementary and secondary education. They have commissioned a series of papers on key issues, requiring the authors to provide evidence of the effects of various programs and initiatives, and to provide recommendations. CEP also convened a series of public forums to discuss several of the papers. The result will be a set of recommendations for President Obama and the new Congress for shaping the federal role in elementary and secondary education. (Center on Education Policy, September 2009) ...

The 2008 Amendments to the Federal Higher Education Act: Are We On the Right Track? - This policy brief summarizes the Higher Education Amendments of 2008 (HEA 2008) and the evaluation of the HEA since 1965, particularly the federal and non-federal forms of financial assistance aimed at increasing educational opportunity and attainment in the United States. The brief concludes with findings and suggestions for future improvement. (Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education, March 2009) ...

Does the Senate Make the Grade? Report Card on Education for the U.S. Senate - The Center on Education Policy has developed a legislative report card on education issues for the U.S. Senate. The report card focuses on legislation recently passed by the Senate to reshape the major federal education programs for grades K-12. (Center for Education Policy, June 2001)...

No Child Left Behind: Views About the Potential Impact of the Bush Administration's Education Proposals - Central to the Bush Administrationís education plan are proposals to increase the flexibility of federal programs, strengthen accountability for student performance and offer school choice options. This monograph examines the implications of the proposals based on interviews conducted with leading policymakers, educators and researchers. The study was sponsored by The George Washington University and graduate students carried out the interviews as part of a course on federal education policy. (Iris C. Rotberg, Kenneth J. Bernstein, Suzanne B. Ritter, Institute for Education Policy Studies, The George Washington University, July 2001) ...

Consolidated Aappropriations Act for 2001 - President Clinton signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act for 2001, which provides funds for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, including a record 18% increase for education. The $42 billion for education includes $6.5 billion in new funding to reduce class size, provide emergency repairs for run-down schools, increase after-school opportunities, improve teacher quality, help turn around low-performing schools, strengthen support for children with disabilities, and expand access to and funding for college. (U. S. Department of Education, 2000)...


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